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  • Historical Maps

    Historical Maps

    A collection of historical maps covering the Bosnian (and Herzegovinian) history from its beginning to our days. The following is a list of maps published in various historical atlases.
  • Serb held concentration camps

    Serb held concentration camps

    Multimedia map covering locations of the Serb held concentration camps in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro and Serbia.
  • Croat held concentration camps

    Croat held concentration camps

    Multimedia map covering locations of the Croat held concentration camps in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Medieval II Total War - Kingdom of Bosnia Mod

Early History

Ottoman Rule 1463-1606


The Kingdom of Bosnia was conquered with great speed by the Turkish army in the early summer of 1463. From then on the heart lands of the old Banate of Bosnia, together with the foothold which the Turks had already

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Stećci - Bosnian monumental medieval tombstones


Stećci are monumental medieval tombstones that lie scattered across the landscape of Bosnia and Herzegovina. They are the country's most legendary symbol. These are the tombstones of those who lived between the

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Austro-Hungarian Rule


Russia and the Habsburg monarchy had vied for political and economic influence in Southeastern Europe since the eighteenth century. Ottoman weakness, growing Russian influence in the area, and the realization that

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Modern History

2. - 3. May 1992


"Bosnia or Death" is an untold story of 2nd and 3rd May 1992, the historic days of crucial importance for the defense of the city of Sarajevo and the state of Bosnia and Herzegovina. These fateful events in this

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Occupation of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina


Following the new secret negotiations between Slobodan Milosevic and Franjo Tudjman about the division and destruction of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, with its collaborationist formations

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Markale Massacre - Sarajevo (05 February 1994)


This was the first massacre that occurred at the Markale (market) located in the historic core of Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In the first massacre at the "Markale" market on the 05.

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Gornji Vakuf is a town to the south of the Lašva Valley and of strategic importance at a crossroads en route to Central Bosnia. It is 48 kilometres from Novi Travnik and about one hour's drive from Vitez in an armoured vehicle. For Croats it was a very important connection between the Lašva Valley and Herzegovina, two territories included in the self-proclaimed Croatian Community of Herzeg-Bosnia. The Croat forces shelling reduced much of the historical oriental center of the town of Gornji Vakuf to rubble. [51]

On January 10, 1993, just before the outbreak of hostilities in Gornji Vakuf, the Croat Defence Council (HVO) commander Luka Šekerija, sent a "Military – Top Secret" request to Colonel Tihomir Blaškić and Dario Kordić, (later convicted by ICTY of war crimes and crimes against humanity i.e. ethnic cleansing) for rounds of mortar shells available at the ammunition factory in Vitez. [52] Fighting then broke out in Gornji Vakuf on January 11, 1993, sparked by a bomb which had been placed by Croats in a Bosniak-owned hotel that had been used as a military headquarters. A general outbreak of fighting followed and there was heavy shelling of the town that night by Croat artillery. [51]

During cease-fire negotiations at the Britbat HQ in Gornji Vakuf, colonel Andric, representing the HVO, demanded that the Bosnian forces lay down their arms and accept HVO control of the town, threatening that if they did not agree he would flatten Gornji Vakuf to the ground. [51] [53] The HVO demands were not accepted by the Bosnian Army and the attack continued, followed by massacres on Bosnian Muslim civilians in the neighbouring villages of Bistrica, Uzricje, Duša, Ždrimci and Hrasnica.[54] [55] During the Lašva Valley ethnic cleansing it was surrounded by Croatian Army and Croatian Defence Council for seven months and attacked with heavy artillery and other weapons (tanks and snipers). Although Croats often cited it as a major reason for the attack on Gornji Vakuf, the commander of the British Britbat company claimed that there were no Muslim holy warriors in Gornji Vakuf (commonly known as Mujahideen) and that his soldiers did not see any. The shelling campaign and the attackes during the war resulted in hundreds of injured and killed, mostly Bosnian Muslim civilians. [51]


References:

1. a b c d "ICTY: Kordic and Cerkez verdict - IV. Attacks on towns and villages: killings - 2. The Conflict in Gornji Vakuf". [51]
2. "ICTY: Kordic and Cerkez verdict - IV. Attacks on towns and villages: killings - 4. Role of Dario Kordic". [52]
3. "SENSE Tribunal: Poziv na predaju". [53]
4. "SENSE Tribunal: Ko je poceo rat u Gornjem Vakufu". [54]
5. "SENSE Tribunal: "James Dean" u Gornjem Vakufu". [55]

Tags: Lašva Valley, Croatian aggression, Gornji Vakuf shelling

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